All posts by jamiesnook

“We’re Made Criminals Just to Eat off the Land”: Colonial Wildlife Management and Repercussions on Inuit Well-Being

Across Inuit Nunangat, Inuit rely on wildlife for food security, cultural continuity, intergenerational learning, and livelihoods. Caribou has been an essential species for Inuit for millennia, providing food, clothing, significant cultural practices, and knowledge-sharing. Current declines in many caribou populations—often coupled with hunting moratoriums—have significant impacts on Inuit food, culture, livelihoods, and well-being. Following an ...

Co-management led research and sharing space on the pathway to Inuit self-determination in research.

Northern Public Affairs recently published "Co-management led research and sharing space on the pathway to Inuit self-determination in research" authored by myself, Ashlee Cunsolo, & Aaron Dale. "The co-management boards across Canada are an important outcome of the land claims political mobilization process, and the research they lead not only represents the implementation of land ...

University of Guelph experts track a changing North to improve health, environment and food security.

Click here for the spring edition of Portico Magazine featuring environmental research in Labrador.

A Half Century in the Making: Governing Commercial Fisheries Through Indigenous Marine Co-management and the Torngat Joint Fisheries Board

Abstract A network of Indigenous co-management organizations is alive and robust within the management of fisheries in Canada and, subsequently, forms an important part of Arctic marine governance. This chapter examines Indigenous co-management in the Labrador Inuit Settlement Region of Nunatsiavut, Labrador through a case study of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement and the ...